Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Good Bye Telemarketers!



If you are a victim of annoying telemarketer calls you don't have to worry anymore because the Do Not Call List is ready for Canadians as of today. I took the liberty of tracking down the info for everybody for consumers. I have copied the information right from the site and pasted it here but if you want to go to the original site and find out other information here's the link.

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Key facts for consumers

The National Do Not Call List (DNCL) is designed to reduce the number of unwanted telemarketing calls and faxes Canadians receive.

1. How to register?

  • You can register your home phone, cellular or fax number(s) on the National DNCL.
  • Signing up is simple, quick and free. You can sign up online at www.LNNTE-DNCL.gc.ca or by calling the toll-free numbers 1-866-580-DNCL (1-866-580-3625) or 1-888-DNCL-TTY (1-888-362-5889).
  • Once you have signed up, many telemarketers can no longer call you starting 31 days after your registration.
  • You must renew your registration every three years if you want your number(s) to stay on the National DNCL.

2. Who can still call you?

  • Registering on the National DNCL will reduce but not eliminate all telemarketing calls and faxes.
  • There are certain kinds of telemarketing calls and faxes that are exempt from the National DNCL, including those made by or on behalf of:
  • registered charities seeking donations
  • newspapers looking for subscriptions
  • political parties and their candidates, and
  • companies with whom you have an existing commercial relationship; for example, if you have done business with a company in the previous 18 months––such as a carpet-cleaning company––that company can call you.
  • Telemarketers making exempt calls must maintain their own do not call lists. If you do not want to be called by these telemarketers, you can ask to be put on their do not call lists. They are obliged to do so within 31 days.
  • For more information, see Part II of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules and the Telecommunications Act.

3. Market research, polls and surveys

  • You will continue to receive calls from organizations conducting market research, polls or surveys even though you are registered on the National DNCL. These are not considered telemarketing calls because they are not selling a product or service, or requesting donations.

4. Rules telemarketers must follow when they call

  • Among other things, telemarketers must:
  • identify who they are and, upon request, provide you with a fax or telephone number where you can speak to someone about the telemarketing call
  • display the telephone number that they are calling from or that you can call to reach them, and
  • only call or send faxes between 9:00 a.m. and 9:30 p.m. on weekdays and between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. on weekends.
  • Telemarketers must not use Automatic Dialing and Announcing Device (devices that dial telephone numbers automatically and deliver a pre-recorded message). However, these devices can be used by police and fire departments, schools and hospitals, as well as for appointment reminders and thank you calls.
  • For more information, see Part III and Part IV of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.

5. Complaints

  • Complaints about telemarketers can be made through the National DNCL website (www.LNNTE-DNCL.gc.ca) or by calling the toll-free numbers 1-866-580-DNCL (1-866-580-3625) or 1-888-DNCL-TTY (1-888-362-5889).
  • Types of complaints can include receiving a call even though you have registered on the National DNCL, receiving a call outside of permitted calling hours, a telemarketer who does not put your name and number on their do not call list, or any other violation of the rules.
  • When making a complaint, remember that you must provide information such as the date of the call and the name or telephone number of the telemarketer.
  • The CRTC will investigate complaints and can penalize telemarketers found to be in violation of any of the CRTC’s Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.
  • The CRTC can levy penalties of up to $1,500 for an individual and up to $15,000 for a corporation, for each violation.

Date Modified: 2008-09-30

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Say goodbye to tripping over things running for the phone just to get a blast of fog horn in your ear because you've just won a free trip! Yeah right! LEAVE ME ALONE! I pay to have phone service... not to be harassed.

Hope this helps everyone out!


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